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Does Whitening Toothpaste Really Get Results?

Does Whitening Toothpaste Really Get Results?

For a lot of people, whitening toothpaste looks like an odd idea. After all, you previously brush your teeth, right? What is so different about whitening toothpaste? Moreover, does this type of toothpaste provide the other benefits that you have come to expect from your former toothpaste?

Firstly, don’t be worried, as a tooth paste having whitening properties seriously isn’t quite different from the toothpaste that you already use. It will still perform as you expect it to. As with something similar to tartar control tooth paste, the brightening attribute is definitely an extra and doesn’t substitute whatever you expect your toothpaste to do- to keep your own teeth thoroughly clean, healthy and clear of difficulties such as gum sickness.

Whitening toothpaste does its job by utilizing mild abrasives that assist to gently eliminate unsightly stains with daily use. In addition, your teeth are bleached slightly by ingredients like hydrogen peroxide or carbamide peroxide, which are not unhealthy. While this type of toothpaste is not as powerful as whitening strips or kits, they are ideal for folks who don’t need fast or spectacular outcomes straight away. They’re also a great supplement to a bleaching program.

So as you can see, teeth whitening toothpaste is not a gimmick. It’s also not an instant alternative or a cure-all, but it may be a great method to whiten your teeth over time. When you go into it not looking for instant results, but instead step-by-step advancements over time, you will be pleased. This runs specifically true if you can appreciate the low price of this kind of toothpaste, which is usually not more expensive than the ordinary tooth paste that you usually use.…

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Whole Food Vitamins

Natural Healthy Skin Care – How to Take Care of Your Skin Naturally

Taking care of your skin is the most important part of any beauty routine, but we often don’t do it. We just tend to wash our face with whatever soap is handy. We normally don’t use sunscreen as often as we should and then we notice our skin is getting darker. We may try to use products that have harsh ingredients in them in an attempt to eliminate dark and problem areas. Some of these products can actually make your skin worse. If you want to improve the appearance of your skin, you can try doing things that will help you maintain a natural healthy skin care routine.
The first thing that you should do is protect your skin from the sun at all times. This means not only using sunscreen but using a hat and light scarf or umbrella when you are in direct sunlight for long periods of time. You may think that this sounds extreme, but if you do not protect your skin from the sun, you will have patches of dark pigmentation on your face and other areas in a few years. If you already have dark areas or dark freckles on your body and face, you should be diligent about avoiding any other sun exposure. If you are trying to establish some natural healthy skin care habits, try leaving post-it notes in your car to remind you that you need to use sunscreen.
You can find some inexpensive natural healthy skin care products at your drugstore or local discount retail store. You should look at the label on the products to make sure that the ingredients are natural. You may find a cheap bar of natural soap at a drugstore that can help you get started on a way to having naturally beautiful skin. If you are looking for cosmetics that contain natural ingredients, you can try looking for them online before you go to a store. Many companies are starting to offer powders and foundations that are made from natural ingredients.
You want to avoid any products that contain ingredients that may irritate your skin and make it more sensitive to the sun. Using natural healthy skin care products can help you look your best without causing your skin to have a bad reaction. If you are looking for a natural cosmetic, you will want to use a powder that is made from mineral powder. Mineral powder is a natural ingredient that will adhere to your skin and provide a long-lasting smooth look. Some skin care products contain vitamins and anti-oxidants to help your skin maintain a healthy appearance.…

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General Article

Choosing the Perfect Toothpaste

Choosing the Perfect Toothpaste

Brushing your teeth with toothpaste is a very important part of a dental hygiene regimen. However, there’s hardly a “just plain toothpaste” option that you can buy at the grocery store. Toothpastes are made with extra fluoride, baking soda, and other ingredients to help polish up your smile. With all of the choices out there, how can you know what toothpaste will work best for your teeth?

Toothpaste, along with the circular motion that dentists recommend you should move your toothbrush in, works to remove the buildup of plaque that forms on the surface of your teeth. The bacteria that makes up the plaque promotes gum disease, cavities, and tooth decay. Also, fluoride in the toothpaste helps protect your teeth from future bacterial attacks by making it stronger. Cosmetically, toothpaste polishes your teeth, leading to a sparkly white smile, and cleans the mouth, giving you fresh breath.

Fluoride is a common ingredient in toothpaste, although you can find toothpaste that does not contain the mineral. While it can help strengthen your teeth, fluoride is also poisonous if swallowed in large amounts. Also, too much toothpaste can lead to your teeth having a streaky appearance. Therefore, it can be a good idea to find a toothpaste that as a moderate amount of fluoride.

Toothpastes that tout themselves as extra plaque protection or extended tartar control usually contain chemical compounds such as pyrophosphates and zinc citrate that prevent the buildup of bacteria on your teeth throughout the day. Triclosan, an antibacterial also present in some face washes, is added to some toothpastes to kill any bacteria that might try to live on your teeth.

If you want to feel confident about flashing your pearly whites, you may choose a whitening toothpaste to keep your chompers in tip-top shape. Whitening toothpastes can help remove stains on your teeth by utilizing either abrasive compounds, chemicals, or a combination of the two. A common whitening ingredient in toothpaste is baking soda. Also, keep in mind that the polishers don’t usually have bleach, or sanding materials that are more abrasive than normal non-whiteners.

Some people have problems with extra-sensitive teeth. It hurts them to eat overly hot or cold foods, and sometimes their teeth are sensitive to touch. There are certain toothpastes that are marketed for these easily irritated teeth that contain ingredients that help desensitize teeth, such as potassium nitrate and strontium chloride. The chemicals help reduce the pain by blocking nerve passageways. Don’t expect instant results, though; some take several weeks to affect your teeth enough for you to notice.

As always, it is a good idea to American Dental Association-approved toothpastes. Keep in mind that the ADA only approves toothpaste with fluoride, so if you are looking for a fluoride-free paste, you need to be extra careful in choosing a legitimately beneficial toothpaste.

For more health-related information about everything from healthy cooking to dentists in your area, check out the Health Directory.…

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General Article

Does Fluoride Cause Spotted Teeth?

Does Fluoride Cause Spotted Teeth?

In the early 1950’s concerns about dental health among children led to controversy when it was proposed that fluoride be added to drinking water. In Grand Rapids, Michigan fluoride was added to the drinking water and studies six years later found a dramatic decline in tooth decay among the children there. The Surgeon General endorsed water fluoridation and many communities responded by fluoridating city water supplies. Dentists joined in supporting this pronouncement.

In 1955, toothpaste manufacturers jumped on the fluoride bandwagon and America began to see an array of “Look, Mom, no cavities” commercials. Today, fluoride is being added to some bottled waters and to sodas. There are fluoride supplements available for children. Mouthwash contains fluoride.

Maybe young children are getting too much of a good thing. Federal health officials believe that Americans are getting too much of the chemical. Last week the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services announced plans to lower the recommended level of fluoride in drinking water for the first time since the 1950’s.

Why is that? They have discovered spotting and streaking on the teeth of about 40% of teenagers. Since the condition has been seen increasing in the last thirty years, officials looked to additional research studies to evaluate the problems. What they found in reviewing research by The Environmental Protection Agency is that long-term intake of fluoride can increase the risk of bone deformities which can cripple people. Greater risks of broken bones were also suspected.

Seventy years ago it appeared that people whose water and soil contained higher levels of fluoride had fewer cavities. However, a recent report by The National Academy of Sciences found that the serious fluoridosis can occur when the chemical is added to water at the level of two parts per million. Additionally, they found that with intake at the level of four parts per million could raise the incidence of bone fractures.

Whether or not water fluoridation is beneficial has been controversial for decades. Some point to the statistics in European countries where fluoride is seldom added to the water supplies. Some say water fluoridation is forcing medicine on us.

What is clear in light of recent studies is that the dental danger occurs mostly to young children who take in high amounts of fluoride before their permanent teeth have developed and cut through. Dentists agree that the damage seen in adolescents today can be covered by tooth whitening preparations.

What remains to be seen? How will the governmental agencies’ recommendations impact change? Will communities alter their water fluoridation policies? Are we destined to experience more bone abnormalities and fractures? What will the next chapter in the fluoridation saga reveal?…