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The Scoop – What Causes Acne?

Acne is not your fault. It is not caused by the food you eat or how often you wash your face; it is caused by a complex combination of factors.
Genetic disposition to acne
There’s absolutely nothing you can do about your genetic makeup. If you are wondering if you’re genetically prone to develop acne, interview your blood relatives. If there is a family history of moderate-to-severe acne, you are at the greatest risk for having a genetic disposition for acne, with onset most often in the early teen years.
Your genetic makeup may make it is easier for the P. acnes bacteria to proliferate on your skin. Your body may be more inclined to produce a swelling response to the bacteria. You may produce more oil. Your pores may plug more easily. Your skin cells may turn over at a slower rate for your age. These contributing factors to acne are all determined by your genetic makeup. In addition, if both your parents have had significant acne, your risks for developing acne is also very high.
Acne and hormones
Hormones are another genetic factor affecting the development of acne. For women, hormones regulate changes throughout her lifetime. Fluctuations in estrogen levels (and androgen levels) can cause acne. As a result, many women experience outbreaks in conjunction with their menstrual cycles. The flood of hormones released by the body during and after pregnancy can also cause acne. And, just when you thought you were too old for acne, you find that the erratic estrogen levels during perimenopause and menopause can cause yet more acne, once again.
During puberty, everyone begins to produce androgenic hormones. One of the things these hormones do is cause the sebaceous glands to enlarge. The rate at which the body produces sebum, or oil, is affected by hormone levels. Too much oil stimulation, causing sticky oil and too little shedding of dead skin cells – and the next thing you know, your face is populated with a new acne outbreak. These hormones fluctuate during puberty, which is why almost all teens suffer from some form of acne.
Other factors that cause acne
One of the most important contributing factors to acne is stress. If I remember my years of puberty accurately, they were loaded with stress – some of it caused by the acne itself, an ironic catch-22. The reason for this is that stress hormones are released by the body to deal with stress, triggering increased oil production by the sebaceous glands. In addition, stress delays wound healing, so the breakouts last longer.
Environment is another factor in acne outbreaks. Pollution, exposure to oil or grease, dry air, and high humidity all have an effect on your skin and play a part in acne outbreaks. Put a teen in front of a fryer for a couple of hours after school every day and you can pretty much take bets on the next outbreak of acne.
A variety of over-the-counter and prescription medications may have side effects that affect your body’s chemistry, leading to changes in hormones that instigate acne. These include any drugs regulating or stimulating androgenic hormones (which is why athletes using corticosteroids, legal of otherwise, typically have a lot of acne), phenobarbital and some other anti-epileptic drugs.
If your mother keeps telling you to keep your hands off your face, she has a good reason – excessive rubbing or irritation to the skin can lead to acne. Holding the telephone too close to your face, sweating in a football or bicycle helmet, a backwards baseball cap with the strap pressing on your forehead – all these can lead to acne outbreaks. If you hold a cell phone to one side of your face, you may notice you break out more on that side. Even the strap of a purse can cause an outbreak on your shoulder.
If you are having problems with acne, use cosmetics, sunscreens and moisturizers that are noncomedogenic. This means they have been specifically formulated so they don’t contain ingredients known to cause acne. Otherwise, they may irritate your skin and clog your pores.
With careful attention to the causes of acne that you CAN control, you can reduce the problems caused by the factors you CANNOT control.…

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Causes of Deep Vein Thrombosis

Blood clots are never good news. DVT is the start or formation of blood clots in arteries or deep veins in your body. This is a problem for many but it can be averted with proper treatment and care. Blood clots lead to heart attacks, strokes as well a myriad of other body complications. Deep Venous Thrombosis affects many people in the United States. The problem typically worsens with age. So you may ask, what causes DVT? There are numerous things that cause Deep Venous Thrombosis. A lot of times, this condition is caused by immobility or lack of movement. Blood is supposed to be moving through veins and arteries at all times. If blood becomes stagnant or slow moving, the risk of clots greatly increases. It is natural for our bodies to develop and breakdown small clots through its own fibrinolytic system. The problem however is when various factors alter this balance and that causes DVT. There are various factors that contribute to DVT. Below, you can see a list of them and why each can lead to DVT.

Immobility:

Immobility is one factor that contributes DVT. Being immobile simply means sitting in one position for extended periods of time. You may have heard before that it is important to stand up and take a walk around the cabin if you are on a really long plane flight or train ride. You heard to do this because it has been proven that doing that reduces the risk of blood clots, which can lead to DVT.

Trauma

Trauma injury to any part of the body but particularly the knees, hips or lower legs, puts an individual at greater risk for blood clots and potential DVT. After any traumatic injury, be sure to be weary of this potential problem.

Cancer

Unfortunately, cancer is also a factor that greatly increases the chances of DVT. Any form of cancer increases a clot.

More Causes:

There are a number of more potential causes of DVT and blood clots than those mentioned above. Another potential habit that can increase your chances of DVT is smoking. Smoking is widely regarded as a poor practice for your overall health. That holds true when it comes to DVT complications as well. Smoking can contribute to DVT by making it more challenging for the heart to pump blood properly and efficiently across the body. Other potential causes include some forms of birth control or various types of infections. It is important to remember that any activity or disease that alters the body and its functions in any way shape or form is a contributing factor to DVT. While some things you cannot fully prevent such as cancer, many things you can control and greatly reduce your risk of getting DVT. As you go about your life, you should not be panic stricken over Deep Venous Thrombosis, but rather educated and knowledgeable. Taking the right steps to try and prevent this problem from occurring to you will go a long way.

Find out more information about DVT and venous disease.…

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Rheumatic Heart Disease Causes, Symptoms And Treatments

Rheumatic Fever

Rheumatic fever is uncommon in the US, except in children who have had strep infections that were untreated or inadequately treated. Children ages 5 to 15, particularly if they experience frequent strep throat infections, are most at risk for developing rheumatic fever. The infection often causes heart damage, particularly scarring of the heart valves, forcing the heart to work harder to pump blood. The damage may resolve on its own, or it may be permanent, eventually causing congestive heart failure (a condition in which the heart cannot pump out all of the blood that enters it, which leads to an accumulation of blood in the vessels leading to the heart and fluid in the body tissues).

Rheumatic Heart Disease Symptoms

The symptoms of rheumatic fever usually start about one to five weeks after your child has been infected with Streptococcus bacteria. The following are the most common symptoms of rheumatic fever. However, each child may experience symptoms differently. Symptoms may include:

– Joint inflammation – including swelling, tenderness, and redness over multiple joints. The joints affected are usually the larger joints in the knees or ankles. The inflammation “moves” from one joint to another over several days.- Small nodules or hard, round bumps under the skin.- A change in your child’s neuromuscular movements (this is usually noted by a change in your child’s handwriting and may also include jerky movements).- Rash (a pink rash with odd edges that is usually seen on the trunk of the body or arms and legs).- Fever.- Weight loss.- Fatigue.- Stomach pains.

The symptoms of rheumatic fever may resemble other conditions or medical problems. Always consult your child’s physician for a diagnosis.

Treatment for rheumatic heart disease:

Specific treatment for rheumatic heart disease will be determined by your child’s physician based on:

Your child’s overall health and medical history.

– Extent of the disease.- Your child’s tolerance for specific medications, procedures, or therapies.- Expectations for the course of the disease.- Your opinion or preference.

The best treatment for rheumatic heart disease is prevention. Antibiotics can usually treat strep throat (a Streptococcus bacterial infection) and stop acute rheumatic fever from developing. Antibiotic therapy has sharply reduced the incidence and mortality rate of rheumatic fever and rheumatic heart disease.

Children who have previously contracted rheumatic fever are often given continuous (daily or monthly) antibiotic treatments to prevent future attacks of rheumatic fever and lower the risk of heart damage.

If inflammation of the heart has developed, children may be placed on bed rest. Medications are given to reduce the inflammation, as well as antibiotics to treat the Streptococcus infection. Other medications may be necessary to handle congestive heart failure. If heart valve damage occurs, surgical repair or replacement of the valve may be considered.…