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Health Facts

What Is The Single Most Important Factor In Losing Weight?

Turn on the television, browse through a magazine, look at the shelves of your local pharmacy, and you’re inundated with quick fixes to any potential weight problem. It doesn’t matter what the approach is, or who the experts sponsoring it are, the claims are the same: stick to this approach for a short time and you will see results.
Some diets aim to strike all carbohydrates from your diet, filling you up on only protein. Others provide simple instructions to drink some of your calories, and you’ll stop feeling hungry through the majority of the day. Other people swear by eating cabbage soup (or some other specific food) as a way to shed the pounds.
Regardless of the fad, all such approaches share the same inherent flaw – the fact that they’re all diets. The idea of a diet is straight forward: eat specific “good” foods and restrict yourself from “bad” foods. The problem is that at some point (whether it’s in a week, a month, or a few hours) “bad” foods will fall back on your plate. Any progress made will be quickly reversed.
Think back to every diet you’ve ever tried. Early on, the going is relatively smooth. The weight starts to drop off as you remove forbidden foods from your diet. Then you start to plateau. Or you’re constantly faced with those same foods that your body once used to rely on and are tortured by the temptation.
Gradually, you sneak in one of the forbidden foods, claiming that you’ll start dieting again tomorrow. But tomorrow never comes as one forbidden food becomes two – and the initially promising attempt to lose weight becomes a miserable failure.
And yet, whatever reason for stopping, months after one fad diet has failed you, you’re on the hunt for the next. Before you know it, you’re filling your grocery cart with cabbage (or whatever), hoping that the answer lies in never-ending meals of soup or Tabasco sauce or the latest grapefruit concoction.
That’s the diet side of the health industry. The other side of the equations is the fitness industry. For every quick-fix diet, there’s an equally compelling exercise program promising that in only a few minutes, hours, or routines later, you can have the body you’ve always dreamed of.
Exercise fanatics believe the gym is the real means to long-term weight success. Less dependent on what you’re eating, the true change in health, in their view, comes from how many calories are being burnt out of your system. These claims are just as straight forward as those of the diet gurus: put a small amount of work in, and see the amazing results.
The typical exercise-to-lose-weight program takes a similar course to that of the fad diets. The initial interest carries results, but a plateau eventually occurs. Or because you’re now burning more calories, you also eat more food – and the net result is zero.
For every one of us who’s tried a fad diet, we’ve also tried the quick fix exercise route. The end result is the reason that the health industry is one of the fastest-growing in our nation. Quick fix exercises don’t work, forcing you to go out and try another. Upon plateau, the exerciser or dieter starts to doubt that those washboard abs or slim thighs are going to come before the next millennium, let alone summer. Dwindling motivation, fading dedication and a busy life start to intervene, and the best-laid plans become only that. Action takes a back seat until next January.
I’ve always believed that exercise and nutrition go hand in hand. While exercise is important, the real key to losing weight and keeping it off lies in what you eat. I’m not talking here about a fad diet. I’m talking about a complete nutritional lifestyle change – a holistic approach to weight loss that takes into account that you will most likely fall off the wagon, eat out at restaurants, and plateau in your journey to lose weight and get healthy. Exercise helps, but it doesn’t get you all the way. What you eat is the single most important factor in losing weight.…

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Healthier

For All Single Parent Families – How to Have Sound Nutrition on a Limited Budget

Realizing sound nutrition for your family on a limited budget is synonymous to just eating cheap. Beans, potatoes, bananas, oranges, apples, grains, rice, carrots, oats, macaroni, spaghetti, flour, additional fruits, and vegetables all can be bought at economical prices. The opposite of this is true for unhealthy foods. With this in mind, lets look at ways you can put your food bills on a diet and still have sound nutrition.
Make More Meatless Meals
You can reduce the amount of expensive meat and poultry you buy by changing your recipe repertoire to include meatless meals. If you don’t want to do without your favorite meats altogether, use them ( along with a lot with poultry and fish) as flavor enhancers, rather than the main course. Add chopped meat, chicken, and fish to omelets, pasta, rice dishes, salads, and stews. You will not be skimping on the flavor, only on the budget.
Be a Savvy Shopper
If you want to be the smartest shopping in the neighborhood, shop only in perimeter of the supermarket. That way you will buy healthier groceries. Whole foods, such as produce, meat, and dairy products are always on the outer edge of the store. Generally, the inside aisles are filled with processed and more expensive foods.
Eliminate JunkA�Foods
Just say no to junk food. Food with little or no nutritional value has no place in a frugal shopping cart. Make your own cookies, pop your own popcorn, and make iced herbal teas and other healthful beverages. Don’t buy packaged deserts. Eat more fruit. It’s a healthier choice and will fill you up faster. Avoid sugar filled sodas and drink more water.
Be Careful in the Cereal Aisle
Cold cereal is overpriced and overrated. If you have coupons, use them, especially when there is a sale. But the most frugal solution is to get your family hooked on oatmeal. It is more healthful and cost less. Buy the least expensiveA�brand and dress it up with some with raisins, cinnamon, sliced or dried fruit, or anything else that delights your taste buds.
Create a Personal Pricing Guide
Buy a small notebook and keep track of the prices of items you buy every week. Compare prices at all of the local supermarkets. You’ll likely find one store that sells your favorite flour, cereal, or pasta for much less than another market. An easy way to start a personal guide is to keep your register receipts so that you can record your item costs. Once you finished your guide, you will find that it will take a little longer to get your shopping done, especially if you shop at three different stores, but you’ll spend less money in the long run.…