The Advantages of Natural Toothpaste

The Advantages of Natural Toothpaste

Using natural toothpaste is something you may never have even considered. But, if you’re concerned about reducing the chemicals in your body and living a more natural and health life, you should give all-natural dental products a try.

Natural toothpaste cleans your teeth and freshens your breath without the use of harmful chemicals. There are many harmful things in traditional toothpastes, such as sodium laurel sulfate, which is detergent and is a known skin irritant. Regular toothpastes also often contain saccharin, which has been linked to cancer in laboratory rats. Even the fluoride that we’ve always thought of as good for our teeth is a chemical that can be toxic in large doses. Adults have more to fear from fluoride than to gain.

Toothpastes with natural ingredients provides just as much cleaning as chemical laden toothpaste. Most of the actual cleaning of the food and debris that get on your teeth comes from the act of brushing rather than the toothpaste, anyway. What toothpaste does that’s really important is kills the germs that cause bad breath and gingivitis. Most natural toothpastes contain mint and other herbs. Mint oils are actually the most effective ingredient for killing germs in the mouth. Most all-natural toothpastes contain more mint and herbal oils than regular toothpaste, so they actually kill more germs than the toothpaste you buy at the drugstore. And, many of them are very concentrated, so you use far less toothpaste than before.

Using toothpastes with natural ingredients is also a great way to prevent the gum disease gingivitis. Because this disease is caused directly by the germs that build up in the mouth, better germ killing equals less chance of gingivitis. The mint oils used in high concentration in natural toothpastes are the best way to rid your mouth of germs. They also do a better job of getting rid of bad breath, so they’re an especially good choice for people with severe halitosis problems.

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